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The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog: Book Review

This blog was originally posted at MLJ Adoptions in 2012. I am re-publishing it here with permission (and slight updates) because this is still a resources that I regularrly recommend for any parent needing to know more about neurological development. 

I first got to hear from Dr. Bruce D. Perry at the NACAC conference in 2011. There are some professionals whom it is immediately clear that they understand the big picture. Not all are as gifted with both understanding and the ability to explain complex principles. Not only do I believe Dr. Perry is experienced and wise, his Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) may be the cutting edge of treatment for children that have been adopted. I would make the trip to his clinic if I had an concerns about my child’s neurological development. I am looking into options of being trained in NMT sooner rather than later.

The title The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog may seem odd, it might even seem odd that I would strongly recommend such a book to parents, but it won’t take long before parents understand why this is a book they may want to keep close at hand. The full title is The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog: What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love and Healing. In it Dr. Perry not only explains much about how trauma and loss impact children, but he does it with a dose of humility, explaining how he learned along the way starting with his first patient out of grad school.

Per Wikipedia, “Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D., is the Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy (www.ChildTrauma.org) in Houston and an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University in Chicago. He is a clinician and researcher in children’s mental health and the neurosciences, and an internationally-recognized authority on children in crisis.”

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